Attractions

Lake View

Village Lake View

The flora and fauna of Thar Desert is of unique ecological significance. About 80 species of birds have been recorded in this region: Larks, Pipits, Wheaters, Mynas, Green Beaters, Indian Coursers, Redwattled Lapwings, Gray Partridges, Sandgrouses, Hourbaras, Great Indian Bustards, Eagles, Hawks, Kestrels, Falcons being the prominent.
Nearby are a few water bodies where migratory birds are spotted during the winter season. India's only one, the Desert National Park, is few Kilometer distance from the resort Rawla.Forest Department charges for the camera / Video Camera / Per person entry / Parking charges.

Khaba Fort

Paliwal Khaba Fort

Khaba Fort is a ruined citadel set amid a barren desert village. It's an architecturally impressive landmark full of eeriness, history and mysticism. Wander the dusty streets lined with crumbling houses and almost devoid of human activity. Khaba Fort dates back to the 13th century and was once an important part of Kuldhara, a village inhabited by Paliwal Brahmins. Sometime during the 1800s the residents fled the village and left behind a ghost town.
Climb the staircase to the fort's entrance and imagine a time when it was the focal point of a prosperous village. Admire the turreted towers, elegant windows and intricate latticework. They serve as a testament to the artistic talents of the Paliwal Brahmins. Walk along the ramparts and enjoy uninterrupted views of the village below and the surrounding countryside. Go to the fort's small museum to see displays of archaeological artifacts found in and around the fort.

Bada Bagh

Bada Bagh

Bada Bagh, also called Barabagh (literally Big Garden) is a garden complex about 6 km north of Jaisalmer on way to Ramgarh, and halfway between Jaisalmer and Lodhruva in the state of Rajasthan in India. It contains a set of royal cenotaphs, or chhatris of Maharajas of Jaisalmer state, starting with Jai Singh II (d. 1743)
A descendant of Maharawal Jaisal Singh, the founder of the state and Maharaja of Jaisalmer State, Jai Singh II(1688Ė1743), commissioned a dam to create a water tank during his reign in the 16th century. This made the desert green in this area.
After his death on September 21, 1743, his son Lunkaran built a beautiful garden next to the lake and a chhatri (Hindi for cenotaph) for his father on a hill next to the lake. Because of his father's death he suffered a lot. Later on, many more cenotaphs were constructed here for Lunkaran and other Bhattis. The last chhatri, meant for maharaja Jawahar Singh, dates from the 20th century and remains unfinished after Indian independence.
Bada Bagh is situated on a small hill. The entry to Bada Bagh is from the bottom of the hill. First row has a few cenotaphs. There are many more cenotaphs, which are accessible by climbing the hills. Each cenotaph is carved and is of different size. There are cenotaphs for rulers, queens, prices and other royal family members. Each of rulerís cenotaphs has a marble slab, with inscriptions about the ruler and a image of a man on a horse.

Kuldhara

Kuldhara

Join me as we head on an eerie trail to Kuldhara, a haunted abandoned village near Jaisalmer in Rajasthan.You do not wake up every day to the news of roads being flooded in Jaisalmer. And cooped inside the palatial fortress in Suryagarh, watching the monsoon rains drench the desert from my window, I was longing to step out and soak in the atmosphere. And that is when I heard about the legend of the Paliwal Brahmins. Set 200 years ago, it was the story of a community who had vanished overnight, leaving behind a ghost village to narrate their tale. A haunted trail to a village called Kuldhara near Jaisalmer was organised by Suryagarh at night, but it was tempting to explore the abandoned village during the day as well

Desert Festival

Desert Festival

Desert Festival of Jaisalmer is a colorful festival held in February every year. You will get to see Cultural events, camel races, turban tying competitions etc. Not exciting enough! Attend the contests to judge the man with the best moustache. Everything is exotic in the Desert festival, amidst the golden sands of the Thar Desert. With a final musical performance by folk singers under the moonlit sky at the dunes in Sam, just outside Jaisalmer, the festival comes to its end. The rich culture of the region is on display during this three daylong extravaganza.
The desert festival in Jaisalmer was started to attract foreign tourists, who always wanted to explore as many facets of Rajasthan as they could in the possible crunch of time. The three-day event stresses more on local elements and heritage. For example, this no-nonsense festival will only showcase Rajasthani folk songs and dance. These are presented by some of the best professionals of the art. Similarly, local customs such as Turban tying etc have been added to make it more exotic and colorful in its outlook. 'The moustache competition' is very popular among foreigners. This is simply because of the surprise value attached to this event. Foreigners can be seen posing for pictures with the winners. This is truly a moment worth preserving.
You will never forget marvels like the famous Gair and Fire dancers that are the major attraction of the desert festival celebrations. Interesting contests including a tying competition and a Mr. Desert contest further enhance the fun of the occasion. A trip to the Sam sand dunes marks the grand finale, where you will enjoy camel rides and brilliant performance by the folk artist under the full moon against the backdrop of picturesque dunes.

Desert National Park

Desert National Park

Desert National Park, Rajasthan, India, is situated in the west Indian state of Rajasthan near the town of Jaisalmer. This is one of the largest national parks, covering an area of 3162 km≤. The Desert National Park is an excellent example of the ecosystem of the Thar Desert. Sand dunes form around 20% of the Park. The major landform consists of craggy rocks and compact salt lake bottoms, intermedial areas and fixed dunes.
Despite a fragile ecosystem there is an abundance of birdlife. The region is a haven for migratory and resident birds of the desert. Many eagles, harriers, falcons, buzzards, kestrel and vultures. Short-toed eagles, tawny eagles, spotted eagles, laggar falcons and kestrels are the most common among these. Sand grouse are spotted near small ponds or lakes. The endangered great Indian bustard is a magnificent bird found in relatively fair numbers. It migrates locally in different seasons. The most suitable time to visit the area is between November and January. The Desert National Park has a collection of fossils of animals and plants of 180 million years old. Some fossils of dinosaurs of 6 million years old have been found in the area
Flora and fauna
The blackbuck is a common antelope of this region. The national park's other notable inhabitants are the desert fox, wolf and desert cat. Birdlife in this sandy habitat is vivid and spectacular. Birds such as sandgrouse, partridges, bee-eaters, larks, and shrikes are commonly seen. In the winter, the birdlife is augmented by species such as the demoiselle crane and MacQueen's bustard.
Two great Indian bustards at the Desert National Park Perhaps the greatest attraction of the park is a bird called the great Indian bustard, an endangered species found only in India. Desert National Park is one of the last sites in which this species can be found in good numbers. As such, the species draws in thousands of birdwatchers from all over the world. In addition to the great Indian bustard, the park supports a variety of other birds of interest to birdwatchers and conservationists alike.
The Thar Desert, often called an 'ocean of sand', covers a large area of western Rajasthan. The fragile ecosystem of the Thar supports a unique and varied wildlife. In this vast ocean of sands lies the famous Desert National Park, which provides an excellent example of the ecosystem of the Thar Desert and its diverse wildlife adventure.
The vegetation is sparse, and patches of sewan grass and aak shrub (Calotropis) can be seen. The landscape includes craggy rocks and compact salt lake bottoms, as well as intermediate areas and both fixed and shifting dunes. Around 20 percent of the vast expanse is covered with sand dunes.